Through the Eyes of a Child

Cherie was looking out of the window on the bus. Being the last stop, she always had a long ride home, but she didn’t mind. It gave her  plenty of time to think. Usually she was planning on what she and her friend Cindy would do when she got home. Plotting more tricks to play on Charlie and the twins, was typically at the top of their list. Today though, she was distracted, her mind was on the lesson they had learned at school. 

Miss. Clark had told them about a man who had a dream. A man, Dr. King,  who dreamed of peace and tried his best to share his dream with the world. Cherie didn’t understand why some people didn’t like his dream. She was confused. She had friends whose skin color was different from hers, but she didn’t care, and neither did they! 

Her friends were all different from each other. Johnny was really good at running, nobody could beat him, and Chris could climb a tree almost as fast as a squirrel! Lori, loved to sing, and she did almost all the time, until her brother Charlie would bop her on the head to be quiet. Charlie was the best at thinking of new games that they all could play and Cindy could kick a ball farther than any of them! That drove the boys crazy, but made the girls laugh. Talking about laughter, the twins usually kept them all in stitches with their wisecracks. Cherie was the animal lover in the group. She was the first to spot animals in the woods, and everyone loved playing with her dog, Buffy.  Cherie  could also out jump rope any of them! 

They all had different things that they excelled in and Cherie was glad about that. She wouldn’t change a thing about her friends. They didn’t all like the same things. The twins loved to eat spinach, which just made them crazy in Cherie’s eyes, but they were welcome to all the spinach they wanted. She was thankful for being able to give them the spinach that her Mom sent to lunch with her. Whose Mom sent spinach to lunch? Her Mom said spinach helped one to grow, so Cherie felt like she was doing a good deed in helping the twins grow! 

Lori always gave away her peach pie that her Mom would pack in her lunch. Who didn’t like peaches? Cherie thought Lorie had to be the only one, and she was so happy every day that she got picked to have a slice of the coveted peach pie. Cindy was more on the shy side, but that was okay with everyone. They needed someone that was quiet, for Lori tended to give them all a headache! Oh and when any one of them needed an answer to a math problem Charlie was the one to ask, he could give you the answer in a flash! If you needed to know how to spell, just ask Chris. He could spell Mississippi! 

They all were different, it was true, but when it came down to the important things they all were the same. They all cared for each other. They had made pinky swear promises about their friendship and no one dare break them. They all loved to laugh and have fun. The twins you really had to watch for they could be sly. Boys could be so full of mischief thought Cherie, but sometimes the girls were able to outwit them. 

The bus was slowing, the time had gone fast. Cherie hoped that Dr. King would  someday have his dream come true, for not liking someone just because they are different from you, would never make any sense to her! 

Oh, there was Cindy, waving at her from the curb, and Oh No, the twins were sneaking up on her with something behind their backs!  Cherie bet they had water balloons. The bus stopped and she ran down the aisle and out the door, “Cindy, LOOK OUT!” 

 

 

 

23 thoughts on “Through the Eyes of a Child

  1. Yes, kids have no idea why adults talk about color. When my son was little, he was standing by the window one day and said, “Mom, there’s a black boy riding a bike.” I assumed this was a racial description until my son added, “And there’s a green boy with him.” I looked out the window, and sure enough, there was a boy on a bicycle who was wearing a black shirt, with another boy in a green shirt riding next to him. It seemed my son had thought, quite logically, that when he heard adults describing people by their color, it was like athletes wearing team shirts of a particular color,

    Liked by 1 person

  2. Yeah, kids don’t give a darn about skin color, until adults teach them to. I don’t know how you keep track of all the characters in your stories. There’s a lot of them in this one. I think there should be a sequel, just to see how well you keep them all straight.

    Liked by 1 person

  3. I taught grades 2-6 over the years. The one quality I recognized in almost all of the younger kids was they just wanted to be friends. They didn’t see color, religion, socioeconomics, ethnicity, or any of the other things that are used to divide people into groups. It doesn’t get more basic than that.

    Liked by 1 person

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